Pam Gilchrist To Speak At NKY Chamber Women's Summit 2016Author, Speaker and Business Leader Pamela Gilchrist will be a featured speaker at the NKY Chamber It’s Time to Take the Lead  Women’s Leadership Summit on June 29, 2016 at the Northern Kentucky Convention Center.

Gilchrist, known for Optimizing Outcomes™ for business and leaders will present “Fast Fixes To Ditch Team Dysfunction.” This popular session focuses on why people click or conflict and what you can do about it. As a Certified Personality Style Trainer, Gilchrist will reveal nine universal personality types and provide life hacks for building effective relationships with each style in the workplace.

“You will gain insights on popular figures from Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton to Prince and Oprah Winfrey that will help you easily identify personality patterns,” Gilchrist said. “Whether you’re frustrated by constant correctors, pleasers, competitors, naval gazers or dreamers, my fun, energetic session takes the top off of the box of life and gives you the instructions.”

Nearly 500 women are expected to attend this inaugural conference for the Regional Women’s Summit, hosted by the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce Women’s Initiative. Speakers will inspire and educate, promising substantial take a-ways to bring back to the office. The conference is designed for young professionals, mid and senior career women, those contemplating second careers, and entrepreneurs. Learn how to become an effective professional and acquire the skills you need to ascend to the next level of your career. Register at: www.nkychamber.com.

A former Fortune 500 insider, Gilchrist is founder and chief strategist at the Gilchrist Group, a management consulting, marketing and training firm. A sought-after speaker for conferences and industry events, she also confidentially coaches leaders on personal branding, C-Suite communications, key messaging, executive presence, speech development and platform stagecraft. For more than 25 years, she has studied and applied behavioral communications methods that achieve proven results in marketing/communications and personal development.

Featured in the New York Times Best Selling Chicken Soup For The Soul, she is past president of the National Speakers Association Ohio Chapter, an Accredited (APR) member of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA), and member of its prestigious Counselors Academy. A Michigan native, Gilchrist holds a master’s degree from The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; a bachelor’s degree from Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI, and is a certified personality type trainer through Loyola University Institute of Pastoral Studies in Chicago.

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COLUMBUS, OH – April 17, 2012 — Strategist and Speaker Pam Gilchrist will present “From Chaos To Clarity: Leadership Secrets To Optimize Outcomes” at the NSA Ohio Speaker Showcase at Mills James TV Production Studios in Columbus, Ohio, Thursday, April 19th.

Passionate about adding impact, Gilchrist is a frequently requested speaker for corporate, association and non-profit organizations. Her leadership and life lessons will help you optimize outcomes and navigate what’s next. With her wit, wisdom and inspiring style, she connects with audiences at every level as she shares stories and reveals insider secrets of what works at top companies—and what doesn’t.

As chief strategist at the Gilchrist Group®, executives and organizations seek her expertise during times of dramatic growth and change to move from chaos to clarity. Gilchrist’s proven, international award-winning results grow businesses, guide leaders, sharpen brands and increase engagement.

For more than 25 years, she has held key roles inside Fortune 100, multi-billion dollar companies and consulted with organizations across the country on how to improve impact through breakthrough business strategies, next level leadership and branded high-impact communications.

Featured in the soon to be released book: Best Marketing Practices For Speakers, you will also find her stories in the New York Times best-selling Chicken Soup for the Soul: Life Lessons for Women and other publications.

Whether you are looking for a high-energy keynote or a great breakout session, learn more about Pam Gilchrist at www.pamgilchrist.com.

The NSA Ohio Speaker Showcase Event is being produced by Mills James. In addition to hearing some of Ohio’s top thought leaders, guests will get an exclusive all-access, behind the scenes pass to one of the top state-of-the-art production studios in the country. Mills James has a well-earned, excellent reputation for live, on location meeting and event production and video storytelling. To get all the details or register go to: http://bit.ly/nsaspeaks.

Good news: My partner ExecSense Webinars has just announced that it is turning two of my webinars into eBooks!

Public Speaking & Presentation Skills for Venture Capitalists

How Leading Communications Executives Are Using Internal Communications to Benefit All Aspects of Their Business

They will be available on Amazon.com (for the Kindle), Apple’s iBookstore (for iPad & iPhone), BarnesandNoble.com (for the Nook), as well as hundreds of other bookstores that sell eBooks for viewing on anyone’s computer or smartphone such as a Blackberry or Droid.

Stay tuned for details on the launch date.

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Here is a good check-list to protect your brand. Mostly geared toward product companies, but could also be applied to professional service organizations.

Pam

1. Recognize that a product is only as good as the customer experience

First impressions count. To identify all the elements that contribute to a good customer experience, include production and customer-facing personnel in your product-development process. Then, take steps to ensure that everything is in place.

2. Attempt to anticipate and address potential problems

Before going to market, test all aspects of the product’s delivery. Defects tarnish the company’s brand, and service calls erode profit margins.

3. Provide customers with recourse in the event of a product failure

Mistakes happen. So, always provide customers access to someone who can take corrective action—ideally by phone, with 24/7 availability. Many customers will forgive product failures if they can reach an empathetic support person who remedies the situation.

It’s insufficient to refer customers to prepared “frequently asked questions.” First, company personnel often miss questions that real customers have. Second, customers regard answers that don’t squarely address their questions as defects, rather than signs of their own inadequacy.

4. Treat customers with respect

Avoid keeping customers “on hold.” Staff support lines with sufficient personnel. Many people find it particularly galling to sit on hold while they wait for someone to fix a product they bought to improve their productivity.

When call volumes are especially high, give customers the option of receiving a call back. Also, consider releasing them (and their phone lines) while researching problems or documenting cases that don’t require customer input.

5. Empower employees to take corrective action

My problem was easy to address. The issue was a mismatch between a code included with the product and the company’s database of authorized product keys. The frontline support person could have done exactly what his superior did—resolve the problem right away.

6. Set expectations

This company had sold “fear” of operating without its product, thereby contributing to an expectation that the company would resolve problems quickly. By taking 24 hours to connect customers with support personnel, the company sent a very different message.

Rather than leaving expectations to chance, let customers know how long it will take to get an initial callback. Then, tell them when they can expect a resolution to their problem.

7. Attend to your social media outposts

In the past, dissatisfied customers told 10 people about their bad experience. Today, they can inform thousands with just a few keystrokes.

When they don’t get satisfaction via normal channels, unhappy customers may turn to social media to share their disappointment. Nevertheless, companies that monitor their brands on social media can often turn a bad situation around, before it gets out of hand, if they respond quickly and offer to address the problem.

8. Follow up for continual improvement

Follow up, learn, and improve. Step one is to have a process for capturing and eliminating errors. Step two is to fix the process to avoid future problems.

One company I know classifies a shipment as “dead on arrival” if anything it’s done, or has failed to do, interferes with the customer’s experience. That organization convenes for cross-functional meetings weekly to review DOAs, delve into the root cause of the problem, and develop a course of action to ensure that the problem does not recur.

Source: Marketing Profs & Barbara Bix of BB Marketing Plus

 

What’s the biggest, freakiest thing you have ever overcome?

Think about it for a second.

If you’ve had any “good life experience” (as my father-in-law calls it), you’ve probably had those moments that seemed insurmountable… when the big wave was going to crush you and pull you under.

Don’t miss Keynote Speaker Pam Gilchrist, Friday morning April 8, 2011 at the Ohio IAWP Spring Institute as she shares “Tsunami Success™: How To Surf The Big Waves And Seize Success Now. Pam will share tips on how to:

1. Seize emerging opportunities to strengthen market share 

2. Adapt quickly to the rapidly changing socio-economic landscape
ahead of your competitors 

4. Leveraging core strengths in the new economy 

5. Learn how to be THE industry thought leader in the recovery 

Surfer Laird Hamilton faces those waves every time he pulls on his big boy shorts, crawls on his board and waits for a swell. If you don’t know much about the sandy-haired, muscle-bound surfing kamikaze who attacks waves the size of seven story buildings raging at 30 miles per hour — you should

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Top 10 Drivers of Employee Engagement

Top 10 Drivers of Employee Engagement

Before I took a spin around the track in a race car last summer, I needed some knowledge and training that would help me navigate the track and reach the winners circle. It was critically important that I knew what to focus on and how to do it. The same holds true for leaders.

Here are the top 1o employee engagement drivers that leaders must focus on:

  1. Confidence in the organization’s future
  2. A promising future for oneself
  3. Organization supports work- life balance
  4. Contribution is valid
  5. Excited about one’s work
  6. Opportunity for growth and development
  7. Safety is a priority
  8. Leadership has communicated a motivating vision
  9. Organization’s corporate social responsibility efforts increase overall satisfaction
  10. Quality and improvement are top priorities

The four overall factors that consistently drive employee engagement are:

  • Leaders who inspire confidence in the future
  • Managers who recognize employees and emphasize quality improvement
  • Exciting work with the opportunity for growth and development
  • Organizations that demonstrate a genuine responsibility to their employees and communities

How does your organization measure up? Contact us today for a free consultation and analysis.

Source: T+D Magazine February 2011
“Exploring Leadership and Managerial Effectiveness,” a worktrends report from Kenexa  Research Institute

At my sesson this afternoon at #iabchr10, several corp. communicators asked why when they ask for feedback, they get zilch from employees.

They are information pushers, who say they want feedback and feel like their program is a failure if no one responds.

Perhaps, a little navel gazing is in order.

Do you have an organizational culture that encourages dialogue? Or, more likely, employees feel like they will be penalized for comments.

They have opinions, but feel like they would just be talking to a brick wall.

Does your organization have a culture of communications?

Both Execs & Employees Feel Like They Are Talking To A Brick Wall

The organization’s leaders must change the culture.

Cultural-tone is set by its leadership. If a clear tone that is authentic and open isn’t established up front — employees do not know what to expect. So rather than risk sticking their necks out, they are mum.

The result — both sides feel like there is a brick wall separateing them.

Only leaders can change the organizational culture. You do this by building relationships and rapport — one employee at a time.